POP Peeper v5.2.2 released

Download POP Peeper

See what changed

Notable changes since the last official release:

  • Right-clicking on a message in the list has a new ‘Search’ sub-menu which allows convenient search for sender and subject
  • The ‘Oauth2’ button in Edit-account has been changed to a dropdown for better transparency; you can still reset Oauth2 by re-selecting Oauth2 from the dropdown
  • Skin Notifier: Hovering your mouse over the notifier will prevent it from fading/sliding out

Website Update

The website has been updated and utilizes new software (WordPress). The main look and feel of the website is very similar, but it should now be easier to navigate to find more of the obscure pages (such as the POP Peeper reference pages).

Why was the website updated?

The previous website — which had been used since the introduction of “esumsoft.com” (POP Peeper v4.0) — was built using Concrete5 (v5). Unfortunately, soon after, Concrete5 updated their software and did not provide a way to upgrade; which means that the entire website would have to be rebuilt from scratch. The website continued to work, so I didn’t feel compelled to upgrade. Until August 2021, and things started to seriously break down.

The first indication that something was wrong was that the contact form no longer worked (if you tried to send an email in early August using the contact form — I apologize! I did not receive it) and I could not find a solution. Soon after that, I realized that I could no longer even edit the content of the website, and that’s when I knew it was time to update.

Why WordPress?

I first looked at the latest version of Concrete5 and Joomla but, unfortunately, they both had problems right out of the gate (one failed during installation and the other had errors when trying to add the first page). My third choice was WordPress and this was ultimately the right decision. I’ve used WordPress for the (old) blog for many years; it auto-updates and I’ve never had an issue with the update. It also has the most community support and is the least likely of any CMS to call it quits. There was a learning curve after using the older version of Concrete5, but once I learned the details, I realized that it has a lot more power than I had before, as well as being more accessible.